• Recent Posts

  • Obama sends 1,500 More US troops to Iraq

    Obama sends 1,500 More US troops to Iraq
    President Barack Obama approved sending up to 1,500 US troops to Iraq, almost doubling the number of land forces in the country to support the Iraqi and Kurdish forces in the fight against the Islamic State, US officials said Friday. Obama’s decision greatly expands the scope of the US campaign and geographical distribution of US forces, some of which are addressed to the province of Anbar, hard-fought, first as advisor’s

    It also increases the expectations of interacting with the Congress after the Democrats lost the majority in favor of the Republicans in elections this week. The White House said it would ask Congress 1.600 million for a new “fund training and equipping of Iraq” and billions more for operations against the terrorist group.
    The Pentagon spokesman Admiral John Kirby, said the funds would have to be approved before the first additional forces sent to Iraq, something that an official speculated might happen in just weeks. “(Iraqi forces) are on the offensive now. And this is designed to help them be able to keep doing it, to improve their capacity and competence in the field,” Kirby said, insisting that no American forces take office combat.
    Alarmed by the advance of Islamic militants across Iraq, Obama began sending non-combat troops back to Iraq in the summer, for the first time since US forces withdrew from the country in 2011. Republicans took advantage of a wave of discontent among voters to gain control of the US Senate, dealing a setback to President Barack Obama, who will have to limit their legislative agenda and turn the tide in his last two years mandate.
    The Republican victory was extensive and widespread as it is interpreted as a rebuke to Obama, who has gone from crisis to crisis throughout the year and whose low popularity that several Democratic candidates did not seek their support in the campaign.Republicans also strengthened their control of the House of Representatives and, when he takes the new Congress in January, will be in charge of both legislatures for the first time since 2006.
    Taking control of the Senate by Republicans force Obama to scale back their ambitions, whether acting through executive actions that do not require legislative approval or advance matters in finding bipartisan support, as the free trade and tax reforms.
    Also, will test your ability to reach agreements with political opponents who now have more confidence and have resisted his legislative agenda since he was first elected. Some members of the government team in the White House could change, new air to enter.
    Obama, who came to power in 2008 and was reelected in 2012, called the Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress to meet Friday at the White House to take stock of the new political landscape. The president noted the results of the elections in the White House, and saw little to improve his mood.
    Obama, who was a senator for one term before becoming president, has often been criticized for failing to establish closer ties with legislators.
    Now you will find a familiar face in a position with more power. Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who won a tough re-election battle against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, replace Harry Reid as majority leader of the Senate. Reid has been one of the main political allies of Obama and helped him push through his reform of the health system in 2010.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *